Blog

“Six Days at Ronnie Scott’s” by Brian Gruber: a Vivid, Catchy Read

A fly on the wall doesn’t begin to describe the amazing vantage point of author Brian Gruber’s jazzy thrill ride through nearly a week hanging out with legendary drummer Billy Cobham. Gruber’s “Six Days at Ronnie Scott’s” is crisp and conversational, allowing the reader to whip through the book like butter. A thoroughly entertaining journey… Continue Reading →

Brian Gruber headshot

A fly on the wall doesn’t begin to describe the amazing vantage point of author Brian Gruber’s jazzy thrill ride through nearly a week hanging out with legendary drummer Billy Cobham. Gruber’s “Six Days at Ronnie Scott’s” is crisp and conversational, allowing the reader to whip through the book like butter. A thoroughly entertaining journey from Cobham’s growing up days in late 1940s Brooklyn to the marathon six-day run at an iconic jazz club.

What inspired this book, both the subject (Cobham) and particularly the setting of a six-day time frame? 

I met Bill in France some years ago and, as I was developing a live streaming jazz service from iconic clubs around the world, I saw him perform numerous terms. Milan. Rio. Paris. New York. Oakland. Whenever we got together, he would tell these most amazing tales. He really has played with everyone. Miles. Horace Silver. Billy Taylor. The Grateful Dead. Santana. Hendrix. Getz. Finally, I told him to please stop. We had to at least get these stories all properly recorded for posterity. 

British bandleader, trumpeter, and composer Guy Barker was assembling a 17-piece big band with some of London’s top jazz musicians to perform an original arrangement of Bill’s work at Ronnie Scott’s. So we decided, OK then, I would be a fly on the wall for the whole process. The rehearsals, the sound checks, the backstage meals and banter, evenings at the pub or meals at the hotel. It then struck me that one method of storytelling might be six decades of Bill’s extraordinary musical life woven in and out of encounters with musicians, critics, fans, club staff, and friends during Bill and Guy’s six-day run. It was a creative risk, but readers loved it.

How long did your research take? What was the single most daunting challenge of compiling and synthesizing all the information? 

I had followed Bill for some years and watched his musical methods and studied his history. Once we decided to do the project, I spent a few months before the event interviewing him long distance, then the 11 days in London, two months transcribing interviews and doing additional research, then four months writing the book, and another two editing. The biggest challenge was finding the truth in his story, and in the many interviews and anecdotes gathered along the way. Some themes emerged. His interest in educating young people, which connected with his family life and early years performing, his attitudes towards the business of music, the use of the venue as a “character” in the book, the Mahavishnu experience, the notion of jazz fusion. And many of the jazz greats I contacted for interviews – Ron Carter, Randy Brecker, Jan Hammer, Bill Bruford – were just immediately forthcoming as they have genuine esteem for the man. 

What was your method of extracting the best nuggets of each of your interviews, and boiling down a lengthy chat to bring out the material that would move the story forward?

I think it starts with the technical act of transcribing, and then allowing rounds of edits to mold the story, separating key storylines. And then allowing the narrative of the book to emerge, to dictate its own pace and order, until it all starts integrating and making sense.  

Did you find that each new decade of jazz has something different to teach us?

I’m not sure it’s broken into neat decades, or even eras. Jazz survives and lives because its roots are so deeply grounded in the American experience, the human experience, so it keeps reinventing itself. There is an incident where London saxophonist Ronnie Scott wanders Manhattan’s 52nd Street in amazement after World War II. Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, all these masters playing their gigs then jamming with each other past midnight at clubs along the street. White Dixieland players would jam with black bebop musicians, and genres and styles would meld and ferment together. Bill can do it all. He plays with classical orchestras, rock bands, in one show there will be Latin themes – that 6-day run had a big band feel that blew the doors off. 

Can this book be appreciated by those who are not necessarily jazz fans but want a glimpse into our cultural/arts/societal development over the past 60 years? 

It’s a great book for anyone interested in the act of creation, which, as you know, is a phrase in the title. How did a 3-year-old black Panamanian-American kid have his world transformed by listening to the Latino percussionists in Fulton Park outside his Brooklyn bedroom window? And why does he still create year in and year out into his seventies? Not only is there a lot of historiography, but the backstage moments give the reader an understanding of how master musicians and creatives work, collaborate, learn, rebound.

What is the most remarkable element of Cobham’s career thus far?

They keep happening. That’s the miracle of the life of a lifelong artist. The time when John McLaughlin asked him to test some ideas and jam for two weeks straight, which became the Mahavishnu Orchestra after they added Hammer, Laird, and Goodman. The second year of Mahavishnu when Cobham, playing constant gigs, recording often, and with no training in writing music, composed and recorded the hit fusion album Spectrum, most cuts in a couple of takes. His jamming with the Grateful Dead. His performance with the world’s great jazz musicians at the 1977 Montreux Jazz Festival, an almost unbelievable stage of master craftsmen. Being the percussionist in Muhammad Ali’s Broadway play. Endless stories, and all revealing something of the sweep of the jazz world’s changes over a half century. 

Why does jazz fusion speak to you?

The book starts off with a prologue describing how my brother, a rocker, and my father, a jazz lover, made peace by taking me to live shows in New York. Certain fusion strains, whether the jazz samba albums of Getz and Gilberto, or Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew – Bill collaborated with Miles on that and numerous other albums – or Mahavishnu, brought together generations who could now speak via a common idiom. There are numerous passages in the book that address the theoretical and political aspects of fusion and the heady days in the late 60s and early 70s when young and old musicians played with and invented new genres. 

The single best thing about writing this book… has been the extraordinary experience of living with 17 master jazz musicians for 11 days, from the rehearsals through to late night drinks after closing night, seeing them slay their dragons and take a very complex challenge and execute with fire and heart.  That’s the great cheat of the oral historian – you get to go to places you would otherwise never experience and share those stories with the work, hopefully with style, rich detail, and much respect.

Other comments?

I didn’t know how the book would be received but it received universally strong reviews. Downbeat called it an unusual and welcome addition to the jazz bibliography. That’s quite a humbling tribute. 

For more information visit www.amazon.com/dp/1717493009.

Photos courtesy of and with permission of Brian Gruber.
(c) Debbie Burke 2020

2 book ad

New Foxhole Café

While an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania, Jon Hinck co-founded the New Foxhole Café in West Philly. Now a lawyer, environmentalist, and former member of the Maine House of Representatives, Hinck recounts: The space in the basement of the parish hall of St. Mary’s Church hosted two jazz clubs. The one opened by Geno … Continue reading New Foxhole Café

While an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania, Jon Hinck co-founded the New Foxhole Café in West Philly. Now a lawyer, environmentalist, and former member of the Maine House of Representatives, Hinck recounts:

The space in the basement of the parish hall of St. Mary’s Church hosted two jazz clubs. The one opened by Geno Barnhart [Geno’s Empty Foxhole] perhaps as described above. It closed by the end of 1972. In 1974 a club called the New Foxhole Café opened in the same space started up by a collective including Larry Abrams and myself, Andy Charnas, Rene Charnas, Jules Epstein, Michael Shivers and others.

New Foxhole Cafe, exterior view

Sam Rivers, Sun Ra, Hank Mobley, Philly Joe Jones, Rufus Harley, Dave Liebman, The Art Ensemble of Chicago, Pharaoh Sanders and Anthony Braxton all played there.

Foxhole concerts were broadcast over Penn’s radio station, WXPN-FM. Sun Ra & His Arkestra’s “The Antique Blacks” was recorded in the radio station’s studio on August 17, 1974 (the album was not released until 1978).

Missing Newport Jazz Festival this year? Listen to past festivals here!

Please follow and like us:The Newport Jazz Festival is the grandaddy of all jazz festivals being one of the oldest and longest running music festivals in America. Due to the pandemic, the festival won’t be taking place this year and jazz fans aro…

Please follow and like us:The Newport Jazz Festival is the grandaddy of all jazz festivals being one of the oldest and longest running music festivals in America. Due to the pandemic, the festival won’t be taking place this year and jazz fans around the globe are heartbroken. Do you know[...]

All About Jazz Italy | Daniel Bernardes & Drumming GP – Liturgy Of The Birds, In Memoriam Olivier Messiaen

By Alberto Bazzurro In questo singolare album, inciso nel febbraio 2018, il trentaquattrenne pianista portoghese Daniel Bernardes riunisce il proprio trio col quartetto di percussionisti (in verità anche parecchio melodici, visto l’ampio uso di vibrafoni e marimba) Drumming GP, a generare un incontro appunto decisamente particolare, visto che a tratti il trio agisce in quanto tale, battendo itinerari anche piuttosto noti (il che non significa ovvi o banali), con le percussioni che vi si aggiungono (altrove vi si giustappongono) anche in maniera repentina, inattesa, con effetti di notevole impatto, in particolare nel terzo brano di quella che va letta a tutti gli effetti come una suite pentapartita, “Globular Clusters.” L’opera è esplicitamente dedicata alla memoria di Olivier Messiaen e alle sue tecniche compositive, e in effetti una componente schiettamente contemporanea si affianca alla pelle più squisitamente jazzistica che permea di..

By Alberto Bazzurro

In questo singolare album, inciso nel febbraio 2018, il trentaquattrenne pianista portoghese Daniel Bernardes riunisce il proprio trio col quartetto di percussionisti (in verità anche parecchio melodici, visto l’ampio uso di vibrafoni e marimba) Drumming GP, a generare un incontro appunto decisamente particolare, visto che a tratti il trio agisce in quanto tale, battendo itinerari anche piuttosto noti (il che non significa ovvi o banali), con le percussioni che vi si aggiungono (altrove vi si giustappongono) anche in maniera repentina, inattesa, con effetti di notevole impatto, in particolare nel terzo brano di quella che va letta a tutti gli effetti come una suite pentapartita, “Globular Clusters.”

L’opera è esplicitamente dedicata alla memoria di Olivier Messiaen e alle sue tecniche compositive, e in effetti una componente schiettamente contemporanea si affianca alla pelle più squisitamente jazzistica che permea di sé in particolare il lavoro del trio. Ci sono lievi rumorismi atmosferici e impennate subitanee, cadenze ritmicamente pregnanti e aperture di docile cantabilità, per un disco che sa unire fruibilità e sapienza compositiva, sano piacere di ascolto e sofisticate trame architettoniche. Non tutto è memorabile, ma l’idea è forte e la sua realizzazione felicemente compiuta.

www.allaboutjazz.com

Buy

Jazz.pt | Roots Magic – Take Root Among the Stars *****

By Rui Eduardo Paes Italianos de origem, mas muito negros na música, os Roots Magic sabem tudo sobre blues. Sabem com um saber enciclopédico que supera o dos académicos, porque os ouvem – e tocam – com uma perspectiva apaixonada, única, de arqueólogo e antropólogo sem distância. Os blues, para este grupo, não são só a música de Charley Patton (apesar de este estar sempre presente; neste novo disco, a foto do interior é a do quarteto na sua campa). Para este quarteto de Roma, os blues são toda a herança da música negra que viajou para os Estados Unidos e que se desenvolveu a partir das canções das plantações e do repertório dos “deep blues” (final dos anos 20 do século passado, início dos 30) e dos “jazzmen” que orgulhosamente incorporaram as músicas africanas na luta contra a discriminação..

By Rui Eduardo Paes

Italianos de origem, mas muito negros na música, os Roots Magic sabem tudo sobre blues. Sabem com um saber enciclopédico que supera o dos académicos, porque os ouvem – e tocam – com uma perspectiva apaixonada, única, de arqueólogo e antropólogo sem distância. Os blues, para este grupo, não são só a música de Charley Patton (apesar de este estar sempre presente; neste novo disco, a foto do interior é a do quarteto na sua campa). Para este quarteto de Roma, os blues são toda a herança da música negra que viajou para os Estados Unidos e que se desenvolveu a partir das canções das plantações e do repertório dos “deep blues” (final dos anos 20 do século passado, início dos 30) e dos “jazzmen” que orgulhosamente incorporaram as músicas africanas na luta contra a discriminação dos anos 1960. É a grande música negra americana lida a partir da cidade europeia mais bonita do mundo.

Para se poder ter uma noção da música creio que ajudará ver os autores que tocam: os “bluesmen” (e “blueswomen”) Charley Patton, Geeshie Wiley, Blind Willie Johnson e Skip James. Entre os “jazzmen” temos Roscoe Mitchell, Marion Brown, Julius Hemphill, Hamiet Bluiett, Pee Wee Russell, Henry Threadgill, Phil Cohran, John Carter, Sun Ra, Olu Dara, Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre, CharlesTyler e Ornette Coleman. A ideia de libertação, de luta pela causa negra, de políticas igualitárias e de superação pela música sobressai ao vermos listados os compositores que o grupo escolheu interpretar nos seus três discos. Compreendemos por que é que o grupo italiano não deixa de ir à fonte em Holly Ridge, no Mississippi, antes de seguir o percurso da água.

A banda surgiu em Roma em 2013 e todos os seus três álbuns foram editados pela Clean Feed. É um trabalho que cresce e vai ficando mais consistente. Ouvi-los ao vivo (Seixal Jazz) impressionou, pois a sua qualidade técnica é gigantesca, bem como a capacidade que cada um tem de renovar numa música que parece sagrada (ou que, pelo menos, faz mais pela alma do que muito livro bento). Trata-se de um trabalho apaixonado de quem, como comecei por dizer, dá aulas sobre blues e conhece profundamente a música. Ao estudá-la e praticá-la descobre-lhe racional e emocionalmente as frinchas mais ocultas.

Em todas as interpretações contamos com as releituras dos italianos e estes, por vezes, introduzem composições suas dentro dos temas originais, numa forma de apropriação interessantíssima em que os temas são “infectados” e reaparecem diferentes e mais fortes. É o caso de “Frankiphone Blues”, que abre este terceiro volume, assinado por Phil Cohran (trompetista na Arkestra de Sun Ra de 1959 a 61 e fundador da AACM). Uma peça notável que foi desenterrada das profundezas de um baú de três singles editados pela Zulu Records da Philip Cohran & The Artistic Heritage Ensemble. A adição de vibrafone e flauta cria uma dimensão orquestral e a música tem uma forma e um sentido circulares que nos hipnotizam. Ficamos desde logo agarrados a este disco que já gira no meu leitor de CDs há um mês! Os blues e o jazz libertário magnificamente lidos e estudados, é o que aqui encontramos. Grande disco para confinamentos, desconfinamentos e mais além.

jazz.pt

Buy

On Dog – Dielectric

On this third release, On Dog’s compositional approach is salted with improvisation and the sound palette adds synthesizers and electronic textures to create eleven tracks of utter individuality – one second pure ebullience, the next complex sorrow, th…

On this third release, On Dog’s compositional approach is salted with improvisation and the sound palette adds synthesizers and electronic textures to create eleven tracks of utter individuality – one second pure ebullience, the next complex sorrow, the next bobbing for past references to turn inside out… On Stray Dogs I, Bon’s flute saunters, whimsically...

Jazz’halo | Lynn Cassiers – YUN

By Bernard Lefèvre Bij de viering van 25 jaar JazzLab kreeg Lynn Cassiers carte blanche. Ze introduceerde ‘YUN’ (Chinees voor ‘wolk), waarvoor ze inspiratie vond toen ze maandenlang optrad in een jazzclub in China. Naast de vertrouwde muzikanten van haar ‘Imaginary Band’: pianist Erik Vermeulen, drummer Marek Patrman en bassist Manolo Cabras nodigde ze Bo Van der Werf op baritonsax en Jozef Dumoulin op Fender Rhodes en elektronica uit. Ze bedacht voor ‘YUN’ een benadering van standards uit de Real Book tot een eigen concept waarin ze als elektronica-wizard en zangeres de leidraad neemt. Vooraleer de standard zich prijsgeeft doopt Lynn Cassiers je in een bad van elektronica, nog versterkt door de contrastrijke interactie van piano en Fender Rhodes, de tranchematige baritonsax en opzwepende ritmesectie. Daarbij mengt ze haar betoverende stem en herken je bij ‘I You W’ de standard..

By Bernard Lefèvre

Bij de viering van 25 jaar JazzLab kreeg Lynn Cassiers carte blanche. Ze introduceerde ‘YUN’ (Chinees voor ‘wolk), waarvoor ze inspiratie vond toen ze maandenlang optrad in een jazzclub in China.

Naast de vertrouwde muzikanten van haar ‘Imaginary Band’: pianist Erik Vermeulen, drummer Marek Patrman en bassist Manolo Cabras nodigde ze Bo Van der Werf op baritonsax en Jozef Dumoulin op Fender Rhodes en elektronica uit.

Ze bedacht voor ‘YUN’ een benadering van standards uit de Real Book tot een eigen concept waarin ze als elektronica-wizard en zangeres de leidraad neemt. Vooraleer de standard zich prijsgeeft doopt Lynn Cassiers je in een bad van elektronica, nog versterkt door de contrastrijke interactie van piano en Fender Rhodes, de tranchematige baritonsax en opzwepende ritmesectie. Daarbij mengt ze haar betoverende stem en herken je bij ‘I You W’ de standard ‘I Love You’ of bij ‘Seemin’ Easy’ de tune ‘Easy To Love’ en bij ‘Fair deep blue skies’ dan weer ‘Everything I Love’, telkens ontleend aan Porter. Ook Gershwin tovert ze om tot een surrealistisch klankenpalet (‘Call it Off’, ‘But’).

In ‘All’ (That’s All- Brandt/Haymes), ‘Move Them Mountains’ (Crazy He Calls Me – Russell/Sigman) en We’ll Be Again – We’ll Be Together Again (Laine/Fischer) zet de band op kruissnelheid de interactie voort met vrij spel van piano (Erik Vermeulen) en Fender Rhodes (Jozef Dumoulin) over de altijd intense baritonsax (Bo Van der Werf). En hoe dwars het soms mag los gaan, Lynn Cassiers voegt er structuur aan toe, maakt het vocaal melodisch en harmonieus spannend, fijn onderbouwd door de ritmetandem (Marek Patrman en Manolo Cabras).

Daartussen in leeft de band zich uit met originele impro-pareltjes die luisteren naar de namen: ‘Nucleus’, ‘Nimbus’, ‘Nebula’ en ‘Nube Mechanica’ en zo de kern van het album blootleggen: wolk en nevel.

‘YUN’ mag dan Chinees geïnspireerd zijn, de muziek voelt perfect aan bij het lezen van Haruki Murakami, bizar en fascinerend, even innemend als Lynn Cassiers’ jazz in wonderland!

www.jazzhalo.be

Buy

Free Form, Free Jazz | Pedro Melo Alves – In Igma ****(*)

By Fabricio Vieira Fazia algum tempo que não tinha notícias do baterista e compositor Pedro Melo Alves, ao menos desde o lançamento de seu premiado “Omniae Ensemble”, de 2017. E eis que Melo Alves reaparece, e com um novo ambicioso projeto: In Igma. Este é um trabalho que foi desenvolvido no verão de 2019, em meio a apresentações em diferentes palcos, partindo de uma encomenda da Fundação Serralves para o festival Jazz no Parque. O compositor partiu de uma pesquisa que passa pelo erudito contemporâneo e tem nas vias da improvisação um importante canal. Para tanto, reuniu um fantástico grupo que conta com Eve Risser (piano), Mark Dresser (baixo), Abdul Moimême (guitarra) e as vozes de Aubrey Johnson, Beatriz Nunes e Mariana Dionísio, além de Alves na bateria e percussão. Ou seja, temos basicamente, entre contrastes e interações, duas sessões,..

By Fabricio Vieira

Fazia algum tempo que não tinha notícias do baterista e compositor Pedro Melo Alves, ao menos desde o lançamento de seu premiado “Omniae Ensemble”, de 2017. E eis que Melo Alves reaparece, e com um novo ambicioso projeto: In Igma. Este é um trabalho que foi desenvolvido no verão de 2019, em meio a apresentações em diferentes palcos, partindo de uma encomenda da Fundação Serralves para o festival Jazz no Parque. O compositor partiu de uma pesquisa que passa pelo erudito contemporâneo e tem nas vias da improvisação um importante canal. Para tanto, reuniu um fantástico grupo que conta com Eve Risser (piano), Mark Dresser (baixo), Abdul Moimême (guitarra) e as vozes de Aubrey Johnson, Beatriz Nunes e Mariana Dionísio, além de Alves na bateria e percussão. Ou seja, temos basicamente, entre contrastes e interações, duas sessões, a de vozes e a de cordas e percussão. Aqui o melhor é não falarmos em faixas, mas em partes (cinco) nas quais se dividem a obra. Não sei se Alves a concebeu assim, uma obra para ser ouvida de forma ininterrupta, mas é dessa forma que soa. Parece um erro ouvir apenas um ou outro tema: In Igma é uma composição para ser degustada sem interrupções em seus quase 40 minutos de duração, percorrendo cada parte com ouvidos focados, para não perder cada detalhe que faz o encanto do álbum. As vozes têm papel de grande importância, muitas vezes trabalhando no núcleo dos sons, em uma esfera fonética, além das palavras, em uma exploração poética que nos abre universos encantatórios e oníricos. O piano de Risser é outro ponto central. A artista francesa tem feito de seu instrumento um campo de exploração sem limites e isso se encaixa com perfeição à proposta de In Igma. É tocante vê-la protagonizando o final de “Organum”, com um breve belo solo que serve de transição a “In Igma II – On Meaning”, que abre com delicadas investidas ao teclado acompanhadas pela percussão. Pedro Melo Alves reafirma aqui a poderosa impressão deixada antes em “Omniae”, mostrando que realmente é um compositor de refinadas ideias.

www.freeformfreejazz.org

Buy