Portrait of Joya Sherrill (Podcast #20-006)

Joya Sherrill was a featured vocalist with the Ellington orchestra from 1944 to 1946, but returned periodically in subsequent years. One of Ellington’s best vocalists, she deserves wider recognition. Continue reading


“[Joya] did such a good job on “I’m Beginning to See the Light” that we have been playing it ever since. It is a tribute to her diction and articulation, too, that when I ask them to join in singing it with us, audiences all over the world seem to know the words.”

 – Duke Ellington, Music is my Mistress


Joya2

Joya Sherrill

[20 August 1924 – 28 June 2010]


Joya metronome

Joya Sherrill and Duke Ellington on the cover of the November 1945 issue of Metronome magazine. (With thanks to David Fletcher)


Joya studio

November 1945 issue of Metronome magazine. (With thanks to David Fletcher)



 

Audio, but no video, of Duke Ellington’s 30 August 1970 appearance on Joya’s Fun School  (Thanks, Mike!)



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



 

Black brown and beige2

Black, Brown & Beige (CD: Bluebird 6641-2-RB)

 

I’m Beginning to See the Light

(All of a Sudden) My Heart Sings

Kissing Bug

Everything But You

Tell Ya What I’m Gonna Do

The Wonder of You


Capitol Jazz Sessions

Blue Jay (CD: “Classic Capitol Jazz Sessions” Mosaic Records MD12-170)

Recorded 26 January 1945, Los Angeles

Joya Sherrill – vocal; Rex Stewart – cornet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Al Sears – tenor sax; Harry Carney – baritone sax; Eddie Heywood – piano; Ulysses Livingston – guitar; Jr. Raglin – bass; Keg Purnell – drums.


My People

The Blues (CD: “My People – The Complete Show” Storyville Records 1018430)

Recorded 20 August 1963, Chicago

Joya Sherrill – vocal; Bill Berry, Ziggy Harrell, Nat Woodard, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Booty Wood, John Sanders – trombone; Russell Procope, Rudy Powell, Harold Ashby, Pete Clark, Bob Freedman – reeds; Billy Strayhorn – piano; Joe Benjamin – bass; Louie Bellson – drums; Juan Amalbert – conga.


joya sings duke

Joya Sherrill Sings Duke (CD: Verve 547 266-2)

Mood Indigo/Kissing Bug

Recorded 12 January 1965, Chicago

Joya Sherrill – vocal; Cootie Williams – trumpet; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ernie Harper – piano; John Lamb – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.

A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing/Day Dream/I’m Beginning to See the Light

Recorded 20 January 1965, New York City

Joya Sherrill – vocal; Ray Nance – violin, cornet; Billy Strayhorn – piano; Joe Benjamin – bass; Shep Shepherd – drums.


— Our closing music —-

0000120517It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

 

Portrait of Juan Tizol (Podcast #20-005)

Valve trombonist Juan Tizol (1900-84) was an important member of the Ellington band. Besides instrumental duties, he was a composer, arranger and copyist.

Continue reading

“Juan Tizol was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and suitably named after the saint, San Juan. He studied and mastered every instrument in the orchestra, but finally settled down to specialize on the valve trombone. He came to Washington, D.C., about 1920 in Marie Lucas’ orchestra, and played the Howard Theatre and the T.O.B.A. circuit. When we decided to add a valve trombone, [Arthur] Whetsol took the responsibility of convincing him to join us at the Cotton Club in 1929. He was a tremendous asset to our band….”

– Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


tizol_full


Juan Tizol


715hgw2jyzL


Charles Mingus played for a brief stint in the band of his hero Duke Ellington. Juan Tizol, Ellington’s longtime trombonist and sometime arranger, asked Mingus to play a certain solo, which the bass player decided to change slightly. The alteration so infuriated Tizol he threatened Mingus with his bolo knife. Mingus responded by attacking him during a performance. Here, according to Mingus in his Beneath the Underdog, is what the Duke said to him afterwards.

“Now Charles,” he says, looking amused, putting Cartier links into the cuffs of his beautiful hand-made shirt, “you could have forewarned me–you left me out of the act entirely! At least you could have let me cue in a few chords as you ran through that Nijinsky routine. I congratulate you on your performance, but why didn’t you and Juan inform me about the adagio you planned so that we could score it? I must say I never saw a large man so agile–I never saw anybody make such tremendous leaps! The gambado over the piano carrying your bass was colossal. When you exited after that I thought, ‘That man’s really afraid of Juan’s knife and at the speed he’s going he’s probably home in bed by now.’ But no, back you came through the same door with your bass still intact. For a moment I was hopeful you’d decided to sit down and play but instead you slashed Juan’s chair in two with a fire axe! Really, Charles, that’s destructive. Everybody knows Juan has a knife but nobody ever took it seriously–he likes to pull it out and show it to people, you understand. So I’m afraid, Charles–I’ve never fired anybody–you’ll have to quit my band. I don’t need any new problems. Juan’s an old problem, I can cope with that, but you seem to have a whole bag of new tricks. I must ask you to be kind enough to give me your notice, Mingus.”

From the blog “Billy and Dad’s Emporium”


Juan Tizol’s Oral Jazz History Interview can be found here





The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



 

***UNDER CONSTRUCTION!***

 

small groups

Caravan (CD:”The Complete 1936-1940 Variety, Vocalion and Okeh Small Group Sessions” Mosaic Records #235)

Recorded 19 December, 1936 in Los Angeles

Cootie Williams – trumpet; Juan Tizol – valve trombone; Barney Bigard – clarinet; Harry Carney – baritone sax; Duke Ellington – piano; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Juibiliesta

 

elling_duke_complete1_101b

Juibiliesta (CD: “The Complete 1932-1940 Brunswick, Columbia and Master Recordings of Duke Ellington and his Famous Orchestra” Mosaic Records #248)

 

 

 


Highlights

Conga Brava/Moon Over Cuba (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942 Band” Avid, AMSC1143)

 


fabulousKeb-lah/The Sphinx/Zanzibar/You Can’t Have Your Cake and Eat It (CD: “The Fabulous Ellingtonians” Mercury 830 926-2)

Recorded 7 April 1946, Los Angeles

Dick Cathcart – trumpet; Juan Tizol – valve trombone; Willie Smith – alto sax, vocal; Babe Russin – tenor sax; Arnold Ross – piano; Irving Ashby – guitar; Ed Mihelich – bass; Nick Fatool – drums.


on the air

Bakiff  (LP: “The Duke is On the Air” Aircheck Records #4)

Recorded 30 July 1952 in Chicago

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson, Clark Terry – trumpet; Ray Nance – violin; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, Juan Tizol – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Hilton Jefferson, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Wendell Marshall – bass; Louie Bellson – drums.


 

jazz after midnight

 

Caravan (CD: “The Complete After Midnight – The Complete Session” Capitol Jazz 7243 5 20087 2 8)

Recorded

Nat “King” Cole – vocal, piano; Juan Tizol – valve trombone;

centennial editionPerdido (CD: “Duke Ellington, The Centennial Edition” RCA Victor ‎– 09026-63386-2)

 

maison du dukePyramid (CD: “The Great 1963 Paris Concert, Unissued Material” Maison du Duke MDD 009)

Recorded

Cat Anderson, Ray Nance, Cootie Williams, Roy Burrowes – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope; Jimmy Hamilton, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Ernie Shepard – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.

 


— Our closing music —-

0000120517It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

 


Variations on a Theme Song (Podcast #20-003)

Billy Strayhorn wrote “Take the “A” Train,” which became the band’s theme song in 1941. We survey a number of diverse treatments from a thirty year period. Continue reading

“”Our theme is [Billy Strayhorn’s] “Take the ‘A’ Train,” and I can still hear his voice clearly clearing up any point of indecision with his watchword: “Ever onward and upward!” Many people are indebted to Billy Strayhorn, and I more than anybody.”

-Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


Nance A Train solo 1Nance A Train solo 2

Ray Nance’s classic trumpet solo on the original version of Take the “A” Train. Transcribed by Bryan Wendell Bennett for his Master’s Thesis, “Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart, and Ray Nance: Duke Ellington’s trumpet soloists 1940-1942”  



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



Highlights

Take the “A” Train (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942 Band” Avid, AMSC1143)

Recorded 15 February 1941, Los Angeles

Wallace Jones, Ray Nance –trumpets; Rex Stewart – cornet; Lawrence Brown, Juan Tizol, Joe “Tricky Sam” Nanton – trombones; Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Ben Webster, Barney Bigard, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


carnegie 48

Manhattan Murals (CD: “Carnegie Hall, November 13, 1948” Vintage Jazz Classics 1024)

Recorded 13 November 1948 at Carnegie Hall, New York City

Shelton Hemphill, Al Killian, Francis Williams, Harold Baker, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Quentin Jackson, Tyree Glenn – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guy; Wendell Marshall – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


Greatest Concert

Take the “A” Train (LP: “The Greatest Jazz Concert In the World” Pablo  2625-070)

Recorded 26 March 1967, Carnegie Hall, New York City

Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson – piano; Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Paul Gonsalves, Jimmy Hamilton, Harry Carney – reeds; John Lamb – bass; Rufus Jones – drums.


Portrait of Rex Stewart, Part II (Podcast #20-002)

Rex Stewart played cornet in the Ellington and from 1934-45. Part II of a look at Stewart’s work with the band and the years beyond. Continue reading

“In the Ellington band, Stewart quickly blossomed into a major jazz soloist with a wide range of style and technique. He was a fine melodist, could improvise with a Beiderbecke-like grace (he was a great admirer of Bix’s playing), provide sharply crackling muted choruses of immense drive, or play open solos in a uniquely jaunty manner. Rex also became adept at the plunger-muted growl style which was, by the time he joined, a tradition in the Ellington orchestra. Most importantly, he developed a surprisingly accurate and elaborate manner of playing with the valves of his cornet only half-depressed.”

– Eddie Lambert, Duke Ellington, A Listener’s Guide


Rex Stewart Autograph


 

 

 

Here’s a 1966 video Rex Stewart performing “St. Louis Blues” in Switzerland



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



Duke-at-Fargo-1

Chatter Box (CD: “Fargo, ND, November 7, 1940” Vintage Jazz Classics VJC-1019/20-2)

Recorded 7 November 1940 at The Crystal Ballroom in Fargo, North Dakota

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol -trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto  Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


fabulousZaza (CD: “The Fabulous Ellingtonians” Mercury 830 926-2)

Recorded 5 June 1944, New York City

Rex Stewart – cornet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Tab Smith – alto sax; Harry Carney –baritone sax; Johnny Guarnieri – piano; Brick Fleagle – guitar, arranger; Cozy Cole – drums.


circle vol 1Frantic Fantasy (aka Prairie Fantasy) (CD: “World Broadcasting Series, Volume 1” Circle ‎ CCD-101)

Recorded 8 November 1943, New York City

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Dizzy Gillespie,Taft Jordan – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Skippy Williams, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Wilson Myers – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


R-10842846-1505204854-3500.jpegBlue Skies (CD: “World Broadcasting Series, Volume 4” Circle ‎ CCD-104)

Recorded 3 January 1945, New York City

Shelton Hemphill,  Rex Stewart, Taft Jordan, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Claude Jones – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass;  Sonny Greer – drums.


rex on his ownB.O. Blues (CD: “Rex Stewart On His Own” JDC Records JDC 70179240)

Recorded 8 February 1946

Rex Stewart – cornet, vocal; Stafford Simon – trumpet; Sandy Williams – trombone; Pete Clark – tenor sax; Mike Colucchio – piano; Wilson Myers – bass, vocals; Bazeley “Bay” Perry – drums.


newportC Jam Blues (LP: Various Artists, “Newport Jazz Festival Live (Unreleased Highlights from 1956, 1958, 1963”) Columbia C2 38262)

Recorded 4 July 1958 live at The Newport Jazz Festival

Cootie Williams – trumpet; Rex Stewart – cornet; Tyree Glenn – trombone; Hilton Jefferson – alto sax; Ben Webster – tenor sax; Billy Strayhorn – piano; Oscar Pettiford – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


Big ReunionOne Hundred Years from today (LP: “The Big Reunion” Jazz Greats JG-624)

Recorded


Big ChallengeI Knew You When (LP: “Cootie & Rex, The Big Challenge” Jazz Greats JG-602)

Recorded 7 May 1957, New York City

Rex Stewart – cornet; Cootie Williams – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, J. C. Higginbotham – trombone; Coleman Hawkins, Bud Freeman – tenor sax; Hank Jones – piano; Billy Bauer – guitar; Milt Hinton – bass; Gus Johnson – drums.


Porgy and Bess revisitedIt Ain’t Necessarily So (LP: “Stewart-Williams & Co. – Porgy and Bess Revisited” Disques Swing SW-8414)

Recorded late 1958, New York City

Cootie Williams (“Porgy”) – trumpet; Rex Stewart (“Sportin’ Life”) – cornet; Lawrence Brown (“Serena” and “Clara”) – trombone; Hilton Jefferson (“Bess”) – alto sax; Pinky Williams (“Jake”) – baritone sax; Bernie Glow, Joe Wilder, Ernie Royal, Al Derisi – trumpet; Urbie Green, Eddie Bert, Sonny Russo – trombone; Sid Cooper, Walt Levinsky, Al Klink, Boomie Richman – reeds; Buddy Weed – piano; Barry Galbraith – guitar; Milt Hinton – bass; Don Lamond – drums; plus string section.


RedheadMy Girl is Just Enough for Me (LP: “Redhead” Design Records ‎– SS-42)

Recorded

Rex Stewart – cornet; Joe Venuto – marimba; Bucky Pizzarelli – guitar; Leonard Gaskin – bass; Mousey Alexander – drums.


Chatter JazzLet’s Call the Whole Thing Off (LP: “Chatter Jazz, The Talkative Horns of Rex Stewart & Dickie Wells” RCA Victor LSP-2024)

Recorded

Rex Stewart – cornet; Dickie Wells – trombone; John  Bunch – piano; Leonard Gaskin – bass; Charlie Masterpaolo – drums.


Rex Stewart Baden 1966St. Louis Blues/Happy Go Lucky Local (CD: “Rex Stewart & the Henry Chaix Orchestra ‎– Baden 1966 and Montreux 1971” Sackville Recordings ‎– SKCD-2061)

Recorded 12 June 1966 in Baden, Switzerland

Rex Stewart – cornet, vocal; Jo Gagliardi – trumpet; André Faist – trombone; Roger Zufferey – alto sax; Michel Pilet – tenor sax; Henri Chaix – piano; Alain Du Bois – guitar; Georges Furrer – bass; Romano Cavicchiolo – drums.


— Our closing music —-

0000120517It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.



 

Portrait of Rex Stewart, Part I (Podcast #20-001)

Rex Stewart played cornet in the Ellington and from 1934-45. Part I of a look at Stewart’s work with the band. Continue reading

“…[H]e was an exciting player who made a big contribution during the years he was with us –  1934-45. He was extremely versatile and we made use of his virtuosity on “Trumpet in Spades” and “Boy Meets Horn.” His half-valved effects on the latter have never been forgotten, but he should not be judged only by demonstrations of that kind.”

– Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress



Boy meets horn

Boy Meets Horn, the autobiography of Rex Stewart




Morning Glory 1Morning Glory 2

This transcription of Rex Stewart’s cornet solo on Morning Glory is from “Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart, and Ray Nance: Duke Ellington’s trumpet soloists 1940-1942”
by Bryan Wendell Bennet



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



Fletcher Henderson

The Stampede (CD: “The Fletcher Henderson Story: A Study In Frustration” Essential Jazz Classics ‎– EJC55511)

Rec 14 May 1926,

Russell Smith, Joe Smith, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Benny Morton – trombone; Don Redman, Buster Bailey, Coleman Hawkins – reeds, Fletcher Henderson – piano; Charlie Dixon – banjo; Ralph Escudero – tuba; Kaiser Marshall – drums.


 

elling_duke_complete1_101b

(CD: “The Complete 1933-1940 Brunswick, Columbia and Master Recordings of Duke Ellington and his Famous Orchestra” Mosaic Records #248)

Trumpet In Spades

Recorded 17 July 1936, New York City

Arthur Whetsel, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Pete Clark, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Hayes Alvis – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Boy Meets Horn 

Recorded 2 September 1938, New York City

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.



small groupsSugar Hill Shim-Sham/Tea And Trumpets
(CD: ”The Complete 1936-1940 Variety, Vocalion and Okeh Small Group Sessions” Mosaic Records #235)

Recorded 7 July 1937, New York City

Rex Stewart, Freddie Jenkins – trumpet; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Harry Carney – baritone sax; Duke Ellington – piano; Brick Fleagle – guitar; Hayes Alvis – bass; Jack Maisel – drums.


centennial editionFat Stuff Serenade (CD: “Duke Ellington, The Centennial Edition” RCA Victor ‎– 09026-63386-2)

Recorded 20 March 1939

Rex Stewart, Louis Bacon – trumpet; Joe Nanton – trombone; Barney Bigard – clarinet; Duke Ellington – piano; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer = drums.


djangoLow Cotton/Montmartre/Finesse (CD: “Djangologie/USA, Volumes 5-6” Disques Swing ‎– CDSW 8424/6)

Recorded

Rex Stewart – cornet; Barney Bigard – clarinet; Django Reinhardt – guitar; Billy Taylor – bass.


duke 100Tootin’ Through The Roof (CD: “Duke Ellington: The Columbia Years 1927-1962” Columbia 5176872)

Recorded 14 October 1939, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


highlightsMorning Glory (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942” Avid EMSC1143)

Recorded 6 March 1940, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.;

Dusk (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942” Avid EMSC1143)

Recorded 28 May 1940, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


centennial edition

Without A Song  (CD: “Duke Ellington, The Centennial Edition” RCA Victor ‎– 09026-63386-2)

Recorded 2 November 1940, Chicago

Rex Stewart – cornet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Ben Webster- tenor sax; Harry Carney – baritone sax; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


circle vol 1Boy Meets Horn (CD: “World Broadcasting Series, Volume 1” Circle ‎ CCD-101)

Recorded 8 November 1943, New York City

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Dizzy Gillespie,Taft Jordan – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Skippy Williams, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Wilson Myers – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


world volume 3

Harlem Airshaft (CD: “World Broadcasting Series, Volume 3” Circle ‎ CCD-103)

Recorded 1 December 1943, New York City

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Taft Jordan, Ray Nance, Harold Baker – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Skippy Williams, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


— Our closing music —-

0000120517It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

 

Beyond the “Usual Suspects” once more (Podcast #19-021)

Most Duke Ellington tribute concerts and recordings rely on just a handful of his compositions (Mood Indigo, Satin Doll, In A Sentimental Mood, etc.). The Duke Ellington Society refers  to these songs as “the usual suspects.” While they are worthy … Continue reading



1959 holiday card


Most Duke Ellington tribute concerts and recordings rely on just a handful of his compositions (Mood Indigo, Satin Doll, In A Sentimental Mood, etc.). The Duke Ellington Society refers  to these songs as “the usual suspects.” While they are worthy of their status as standards, Ellington wrote thousands of compositions; there is plenty of his oeuvre that is ripe for exploration!


Despite having a major new work to  promote (Such Sweet Thunder), in this 1957 television appearance Ellington has to take time away from it in order to play a greatest hits medley (aka “The Usual Suspects”).




The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



highlightsAll Too Soon (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942” Avid EMSC1143)

Recorded 22 July 1940, New York City

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


earl hinesAll Too Soon (CD: “Jazz Royalty: Earl Hines Plays Duke Ellington” Soul Note ‎SN 1170)

Recorded 18 March 1974, New York City

Earl Hines – piano.


early ellington rcaCotton Club Stomp (CD:  Early Ellington (1927 – 1934), Bluebird 6852-2-RB)

Recorded 3 May 1929, New York City

Arthur Whetsel, Cootie Williams, Freddie Jenkins – trumpet; Joe Nanton – trombone; Barney Bigard, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds;  Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – banjo; Wellman Braud – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


bug musicCotton Club Stomp (CD: “Bug Music” Nonesuch 79438-2)

Recorded May 1996 in New York City

Charles Lewis, James Zollar, Steve Bernstein –trumpet; Craig Harris – trombone; Don Byron, Steve Wilson, Robert DeBellis – reeds; Paul Meyers – banjo; Kenny Davis – bass; Pheeroan akLaff – drums.


traneTake the Coltrane (CD: “Duke Ellington & John Coltrane” MCA MCAD-39103)

Recorded 26 September 1962, New York City

John Coltrane – tenor sax; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmy Garrison – bass; Elvin Jones – drums.


David Murray The HillTake the Coltrane (CD: “The Hill” MCA MCAD-39103)

Recorded 29 November 1986, New York City

David Murray – tenor sax; Richard Davis – bass; Joe Chambers – drums.


220px-Midnight_in_Paris_(album)Paris Blues (CD: “Midnight in Paris” Sony Music COL4684032)

Recorded 30 January 1962, New York City

Bill Berry, Harold “Shorty” Baker, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance  – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Leon Cox, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


steve lacy gil evansParis Blues (CD: “Paris Blues” Sunnyside Records SSC 3505,)

Recorded 30 November/1 December 1987, Paris

Steve Lacy – soprano sax; Gil Evans – electric piano.


centennial editionAcht O’Clock Rock (CD: “Duke Ellington, The Centennial Edition” RCA Victor ‎– 09026-63386-2)

Recorded 15 November 1967, San Francisco

Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jeff Castleman – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


red hot indigo

Acht O’Clock Rock (CD: “Red Hot + Indigo” Kinetic Records RHO-13IND)

Recorded

Steven Bernstein – trumpet; Don Byron – clarinet; Art Baron – trombone; John Medeski – piano; Chris Wood – bass; Billy Martin – drums.


jingle bell jazzJingle Bells (CD: “Jingle Bell Jazz” Columbia CK 40166)

Recorded 21 June 1962, New York City

Bill Berry, Roy Burrowes, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance  – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Britt Woodman, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


recollections2Auld Lang Syne (CD: “Recollections of the Big Band Era”  Atlantic Jazz  7 90043-2)

Recorded 29 December 1962, New York City

Cootie Williams, Roy Burrowes, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance  – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Britt Woodman, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Ernie Shepard – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.



 

Duke Ellington’s Wordless Melodies for the Soprano (Podcast #19-020)

Dr. Lisa M. Clark’s thesis, Synchrony of the Sublime: A Performer ‘s Guide to Duke Ellington’s Wordless Melodies for Soprano can be found here Adelaide Hall [1901-1993] “The Victor recording of Creole Love Call introduces a device which Ellington was … Continue reading


Dr. Lisa M. Clark’s thesis, Synchrony of the Sublime: A Performer ‘s Guide to Duke Ellington’s Wordless Melodies for Soprano can be found here


Adelaide Hall

Adelaide Hall [1901-1993]

“The Victor recording of Creole Love Call introduces a device which Ellington was to use at intervals throughout his career – the blending of a wordless female voice with the instrumental textures. The singer her is Adelaide Hall, and the first chorus presents the main them sung by her over three low-register clarinets, a delicious tonal combination…”

-Eddie Lambert, Duke Ellington: A Listener’s Guide


Kay Davis

Kay Davis [ 1920-2012]

“Kay Davis was an honor student of Northwestern University, where she studied opera and majored in music. She had perfect pitch, could sight-read, and had all the gifts, so we decided to use her voice as an instrument. This was in addition to her interpretations of regular songs with words, and it proved very successful on several numbers.”

-Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


Alice Babs

Alice Babs [1924-2014]

“[Alice Babs] is just one of the rare people, one of the rarest artists. Whenever I get an opportunity to do anything I feel is out of the ordinary, I think of her. So when I got ready to do my second sacred concert in 1968, where I had to go up over the top of the first, I sent to Sweden to bring her to New York. There were a couple of things in that concert which required real musicianship, which had to read and executed just as they were planned, and she was the one I had complete confidence in to do that. She is a terrific musician, and when I look at the pictures of her taken in the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine – why, I think she looks like an angel! She is a beautiful person who has overcome the problem of singing as pretty as she looks. In referring to her, one never says, “There are just a few left,” because she was probably the only one born.”

-Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress




The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



early ellington rcaCreole Love Call/Blues I Love To Sing (CD:  Early Ellington (1927 – 1934), Bluebird 6852-2-RB)

Recorded 26 October 1927, New York City

Bubber Miley, Louis Metcalf – trumpet; Joe Nanton – trombone; Rudy Jackson, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds;  Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – banjo; Wellman Braud – bass; Sonny Greer – drums, Adelaide Hall – vocal.


bbbcdTransbluency ( A Blue Fog That you can almost see through) (CD: “Black, Brown & Beige” Bluebird 6641-2-RB)

Recorded 9 July 1946, Los Angeles

Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan, Cat Anderson, Francis Williams, Ray Nance, Harold Baker – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Wilbur De Paris, Claude Jones – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Oscar Pettiford – bass; Sonny Greer – drums; Kay Davis – vocal.


jazz collectors

The Beautiful Indians: Minnehaha (CD: “The Jazz Collector Editor ” Laserlight Digital  15 753)

Recorded 5 December 1946, New York City

Shelton Hemphill, Taft Jordan, Francis Williams, Reunald Jones, Ray Nance  – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Wilbur DeParis, Claude Jones – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Oscar Pettiford – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.  Kay Davis – vocal.


duke 100On a Turquoise Cloud (CD: “Duke Ellington: The Columbia Years 1927-1962” Columbia 5176872)

Recorded 22 December 1947, New York City

Ray Nance – violin; Lawrence Brown, Tyree Glenn – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Oscar Pettiford, Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums; Kay Davis – vocal.


Second_Sacred_Concert

T.G.T.T. – Duke Ellington (LP: “Second Sacred Concert” Prestige P-24045)

Recorded 22 January 1968, New York City

Duke Ellington – electric piano; Alice Babs – vocal.


— Our closing music —-

0000120517It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

Beyond the “Usual Suspects” [Again] (Podcast #19-019)

More covers of Ellington compositions that deserve wider exposure. Continue reading

Most Duke Ellington tribute concerts and recordings rely on just a handful of his compositions (Mood Indigo, Satin Doll, In A Sentimental Mood, etc.). The Duke Ellington Society refers  to these songs as “the usual suspects.” While they are worthy of their status as standards, Ellington wrote thousands of compositions; there is plenty of his oeuvre that is ripe for exploration!


Despite having a major new work to  promote (Such Sweet Thunder), in this 1957 television appearance Ellington has to take time away from it in order to play a greatest hits medley (aka “The Usual Suspects”).



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



elling_duke_complete1_101bAzure (CD: “The Complete 1933-1940 Brunswick, Columbia and Master Recordings of Duke Ellington and his Famous Orchestra” Mosaic Records #248)

Recorded 22 April 1937, New York City

Arthur Whetsel, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Billy Taylor, Hayes Alvis – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


steve lacyAzure (CD: “Sempre Amore” Soul Note ‎SN 1170)

Recorded 17 February 1986, Milan, Italy

Steve Lacy – soprano sax; Mal Waldron – piano


bbbcdEverything But You (CD: “Black, Brown & Beige” Bluebird 6641-2-RB)

Recorded 1 May 1945, New York City

Shelton Hemphill,  Rex Stewart, Taft Jordan, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Claude Jones – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums; Joya Sherrill – vocal.


Image result for cootie williams 1945-1946"Everything But You (CD: “Cootie Williams – In Chronology, 1945 – 1946” Classics 981)

Recorded 19 July 1945, New York City

Cootie Williams, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell, Billy Ford, Clarence “Gene” Redd – trumpet; Ed Burke, Dan Logan, Robert Horton – trombone; Rupert Cole, Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson, Sam “The Man” Taylor, Lee Pope, George Favors – reeds; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Carl Pruitt – bass; Sylvester Payne – drums.


The_Original_Ellington_SuiteEverything But You (CD: “The Original Ellington Suite” Pacific Jazz ‎– 7243 5 24567 2 7)

Recorded 22 August 1958, Los Angeles

Eric Dolphy – flute; John Pisano – guitar; Nat Gershman – cello; Hal Gaylor – bass; Chico Hamilton –drums.


Image result for francis a and edward k album"I Like the Sunrise (CD: “Francis A. & Edward K.” Reprise Records 1024-2)

Recorded 11/12 December 1967, Los Angeles

Frank Sinatra – vocal; Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jeff Castleman – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


sunriseI Like The Sunrise  (CD: “Sunrise” Arbors Records ARCD 19458)

Recorded 18/19 April 2017, Union City, New Jersey

Ken Peplowski – clarinet; Bob Millikan, Jon-Erik Kellso, Randy Reinhart, Andy Gravish – trumpets; John Allred, Harvey Tibbs, Bruce Eidem, Jennifer Wharton – trombones; Jack Stuckey, Jon Gordon, Mark Lopeman, Adrian Cunningham, Carl Maraghi – reeds; Ehud Asherie – piano; Matt Munisteri – bass; Chuck Redd – drums.


centennial editionBojangles (CD: “Duke Ellington, The Centennial Edition” RCA Victor ‎– 09026-63386-2)

Recorded 4 May 1940 Los Angeles

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


zootBojangles  (CD: “Passion Flower – Zoot Sims plays Duke Ellington” Pablo OJCCD-939-2)

Zoot Sims – tenor sax; Bobby Bryant, Oscar Brashear, Al Aarons, Earl Gardner – trumpet; J.J. Johnson, Britt Woodman, Grover Mitchell, Benny Powell – trombone; Marshal Royal, Buddy Collette, Plas Johnson, Frank Wess – reeds; Jimmy Rowles – piano; John Collins – guitar; John Heard – bass; Shelly Manne – drums.


HBD Duke Vol. 4Tulip or Turnip (CD: “Happy Birthday, Duke! Volume 4” Laserlight Digital 15 786)

Recorded 29 April 1954, Portland, Oregon

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Rick Henderson, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Wendell Marshall – bass; Dave Black – drums.


Hello RevTulip or Turnip (CD: “Hello Rev” Concord Jazz CCD-4027)

Recorded 1 August 1976 at the Concord (California) Summer Festival

Bill Berry, Blue Mitchell, Cat Anderson, Gene Goe, Jack Sheldon – trumpet; Benny Powell, Britt Woodman, Jimmy Cleveland, Tricky Lofton – trombone; Don Menza, Jack Nimitz, Lanny Morgan, Marshal Royal, Richie Kamuca – reeds; Dave Frishberg – piano; Monty Budwig – bass; Frank Capp – drums.


0000120517It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.



 

“Rabbit’s Blues” – A Conversation with Johnny Hodges biographer Con Chapman (Podcast #19-018)

Con Chapman discusses his new biography of Johnny Hodges. Continue reading

“You ever drink any cool, clean spring water? You can add things to it, make lemonade, beer, coffee, or what have you, but when you’re thirsty it’s hard to beat it just as it is. And it’s probably better for you than the kind hyped up with chlorine. Well, to me, Johnny [Hodges] was like that spring water – the real thing, unadulterated. He didn’t change either. Maybe he added ideas as he went along, but he was always true to himself.”

Earl “Fatha” Hines


rabbits blues

con chapman

Johnny Hodges interviewed by Willis Conover in 1955

From the Oxford University Press Blog – Seven Things You Don’t Know About Johnny Hodges



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



 

51GibiarjzL._SX355_

Rabbit’s Blues (CD: “The Best of Johnny Hodges” Worten Jazz 221 407-205)

Recorded 15 January 1951

Nelson Williams – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Al Sears – tenor sax; Leroy Lovett – piano; Al McKibbon – bass; Sonny Greer – drums; Billy Strayhorn – arranger.


R-4913871-1379359552-6850.jpegWabash Blues (CD: “Back to Back” Verve Records 521 404-2)

Recorded 20 February 1959, New York City

Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Duke Ellington – piano; Les Spann – guitar; Al Hall – bass; Jo Jones – drums.


Highlights

The Giddybug Gallop (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942 Band” Avid AMSC1143)

Recorded 5 June 1941, Los Angeles

Wallace Jones, Ray Nance, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Barney Bigard, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


dukes men vol 2

Jeep’s Blues (CD: “The Duke’s Men, Volume 2” Columbia Jazz Masterpieces C2K 48835)

Recorded 28 March 1938, New York City

Cootie Williams – trumpet; Lawrence Brown – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

The Jeep Is Jumpin’

Recorded 24 August 1938, New York City

Same personnel as “Jeep’s Blues”


R-4513744-1368104532-8453.jpeg

Blood Count (CD: “The Jaywalker” Storyville Records 101 8390)

Recorded 23 June 1967, Los Angeles

Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Jimmy Hamilton, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; John Lamb – bass; Chris Columbus – drums.



 

Portrait of Jimmie Blanton (Podcast #19-017)

During his short, illness terminated stint with the Ellington band, Jimmie Blanton revolutionized the role of the bass. Continue reading


“Jimmy [sic] Blanton revolutionized bass playing, and it has not been the same since. No one had played with the same perspective before. He played melodies that belonged to the bass and always had a foundation quality. Rhythmically, he supported and drove at the same time. He was just too much.”

-Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


Jimmy BLANTON, American contrabass player.

Jimmie Blanton in concert with the Duke Ellington orchestra



A Master’s Thesis by Robert Nash, “The Solo Vocabulary of Jazz Bassist Jimmie Blanton” can be found HERE.


Jimmie Blanton headstone

The modest headstone of James Harvey Blanton, Jr., located in Chattanooga, Tennessee (photo courtesy of Ken Steiner)


blanton

Pittsburgh Courier, 15 August 1942



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



elling_duke_complete1_101bPlucked Again/Blues (CD: “The Complete 1932-1940 Brunswick, Columbia and Master Recordings of Duke Ellington and his Famous Orchestra” Mosaic Records #248)

Recorded 22 November 1939, Chicago

Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmie Blanton -bass.


highlights(CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942” Avid EMSC1143)

Concerto for Cootie

Recorded 15 March 1940, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

In A Mellotone

Recorded 5 September 1940, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Barney Bigard, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Jack the Bear

Recorded 6 March 1940, Chicago

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Sepia Panorama

Recorded 24 July 1940, New York City

Wallace Jones, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.

Mr. J. B. Blues/Pitter Panther Patter

Recorded 1 October 1940, Chicago

Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmie Blanton -bass.


Duke-at-Fargo-1

Sepia Panorama/Pussy Willow (CD: “Fargo, ND, November 7, 1940” Vintage Jazz Classics VJC-1019/20-2)

Recorded 7 November 1940 at The Crystal Ballroom in Fargo, North Dakota

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol -trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto  Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


This ones for BlantonPitter Panther Patter (CD: “This One’s for Blanton” Pablo PACD-2310-721-2)

Recorded 5 December 1972, Las Vegas

Duke Ellington – piano; Ray Brown – bass.