Portrait of Otto Hardwicke (Podcast #19-010)

Reedman Otto “Toby” Hardwicke was one of the earliest Ellingtonians. Continue reading

“The amazing thing about [Duke Ellington] is that the language, the slant, everything, it’s all acquired. It didn’t rub off from someone else, and it wasn’t a legacy, either. He went inside himself to find it. He’s an only, that’s for sure. They threw away carbons.”

-Otto Hardwicke


 

Otto

Otto Hardwicke


Otto Hardwicke autograph

Otto Hardwicke’s autograph


Ellington-Bass-Sax-e1510430131798

Publicity photograph of the Duke Ellington reed section. Top – Johnny Hodges – alto sax, Barney Bigard – tenor sax, Harry Carney – alto sax. Bottom – Otto Hardwicke – bass sax.


 

 



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



 

early ellington

Doin’ the Frog (CD: “Early Ellington – The Complete Brunswick And Vocalion Recordings Of Duke Ellington, 1926-1931” Decca/MCA Records GRD-3-640)

Recorded 29 December 1927, New York City

Bubber Miley, Louis Metcalf – trumpet; Joe Nanton – trombone; Rudy Jackson, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds;  Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – banjo; Wellman Braud – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


 

Okeh Ellington

Jubilee Stomp (CD: “The Okeh Ellington” Columbia C2K 46177)

Recorded 19 January 1928, New York City

Bubber Miley, Louis Metcalf – trumpet; Joe Nanton – trombone; Barney Bigard, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds;  Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – banjo; Wellman Braud – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


 

small groups

(CD: ”The Complete 1936-1940 Variety, Vocalion and Okeh Small Group Sessions” Mosaic Records #235)

The Boys from Harlem – recorded 21 December 1938, New York City

Swing Pan Alley – recorded 2 August 1938, New York City

Cootie Williams – trumpet; Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Barney Bigard, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


duke 100

In A Sentimental Mood (CD: “Duke Ellington: The Columbia Years 1927-1962” Columbia 5176872)

Recorded 30 April 1935, New York City

Arthur Whetsel, Cootie Williams, Rex Stewart – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy- guitar; Billy Taylor – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


 

Duke-at-Fargo-1

Sophisticated Lady (CD: “Fargo, ND, November 7, 1940” Vintage Jazz Classics VJC-1019/20-2)

Recorded 7 November 1940 at The Crystal Ballroom in Fargo, North Dakota

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol -trombone; Barney Bigard, Johnny Hodges, Otto  Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Jimmie Blanton – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


 

vol 4

I Should Care (CD: “The Treasury Shows, Volume 4” DETS 903 9004)

Recorded 19 May 1945, Live at the Paradise Theatre, Detroit

Shelton Hemphill,  Rex Stewart, Taft Jordan, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Claude Jones – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Otto Hardwicke, Johnny Hodges, Al Sears, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


— Our closing music —-

0000120517

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.

The Treasury Shows, Pt. II (Podcast #19-004)

A look at some of the music on Volumes 6 through 10 of Storyville Records’ release of the Duke Ellington Treasury Series radio shows.
Continue reading

“In April 1945, Duke Ellington began what was to be the largest single recording project of his career, though it is most unlikely that he or anyone else thought of it in such terms at the time… [He] signed an agreement with the newly formed American Broadcasting Company to broadcast a series of hour-long Saturday afternoon network shows under the title “A Date With The Duke.”… The recordings of these complete broadcasts…make up the largest single block of material in the Ellington discography.”

– Eddie Lambert, A Listener’s Guide – Duke Ellington


 

 



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



 

vol 6

 

vol 7

 

vol 8

 

vol 9

 

vol 10