My Favorite Jazz Albums of the Year: 30 for ’20 (Part 1 of 3)

The year wasn’t ALL bad! This is the first of three posts that explore our favorite jazz albums that were released in 2020.

Man, this has been one strange year! (Insert your own “no kidding”, or some variant, here)

Though I was fortunate enough to host a Zoom-based jazz talk show (Conversations with Curtis), thanks to JazzArts Charlotte, I heard less live music, this year than at any time, since my teens. I also somehow managed to hear less recorded music than any year, in recent memory. I feel less comfortable than ever declaring this list to be a “Best Of”, because there is so much out there that I’m still catching up with. So, let’s just say that these are my favorites of what I did hear. These are the albums that I went back to listen to, more than twice, the ones that stayed on the CurtJazz Radio playlist for more than just a few weeks.

There are thirty albums that I want to share with you. To keep the posts to a reasonable size, I have divided them into three groups of ten. For the sake of brevity, I will try not to write more than three sentences about any one album.

Here are the first ten of my favorite 2020 releases, in alphabetical order, by artist name:

  • J.D. Allen: Toys/Die Dreaming (Savant)
    • Allen releases about one album per year and he also makes about one trip a year to my “Best Of” list. On this enigmatically titled album, Allen continues his searing, powerful explorations guiding his tenor sax through a recommended set of mostly original tunes. It’s insistent, compelling, and absolutely first rate.
  • John Beasley: MONKestra Plays Beasley (Mack Avenue)
    • The first two outings of pianist/composer/arranger John Beasley’s large ensemble, ostensibly dedicated to the music of Thelonious Monk, made me a respectful admirer. This third volume, which adds compositions by Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, and Beasley himself to those of Sphere, has made me a full-fledged fan. This set swings harder and takes the energy to the next level and every track is on point. A classic.
  • Lakecia Benjamin: Pursuance: The Coltranes (Ropeadope)
    • For me, this is Lakecia Benjamin’s coming of age album. Her previous albums have hinted at her potential but missed the mark in some way or another. Merging Ms. Benjamin’s millennial energy, creativity, and her wellspring of new ideas, with the canon of John and Alice Coltrane, has given these classics a fresh start that we didn’t realize that they needed, until now.
  • Peter Bernstein: What Comes Next (Smoke Sessions)
    • Peter Bernstein is one of the best and most reliable guitarists working in the world of jazz today. Be it as a first-call sideman or as a leader, Bernstein is a consistent arbiter of taste, intelligence, and swing. On What Comes Next, Mr. Bernstein, once again, does not disappoint, bringing us an outstanding set of first-rate performances.
  • Stanley Cowell: Live at Keystone Korner Baltimore (SteepleChase)
    • Stanley Cowell, who was a composer, educator, record-label executive, in addition to being one of the most creative and innovative pianists, in the world of jazz, died on December 18. His work, as a sideman with The Heath Brothers, Charles Tolliver, Max Roach and as a leader, will ensure that legions of jazz fans will continue to talk of and discover his work, for years to come. I’m unsure of whether Live at the Keystone Corner Baltimore, is Mr. Cowell’s final recording. If so, he went out on a triumph. Rest in Power, sir.
  • Wayne Escoffery: The Humble Warrior (Smoke Sessions)
    • I’ve come to expect a certain high-level of artistry from Wayne Escoffery’s recordings. The Humble Warrior is on my “best of” list because he has shown me something completely different in his song selection. Bringing Benjamin Britten’s choral work Missa Brevis in D, into the jazz realm, complete with a dense and challenging arrangement, is one of the most impressive things, from an artistic perspective, that I’ve heard all year.
  • John Fedchock NY Sextet: Into the Shadows (Summit)
    • Though trombonist John Fedchock is one of the best big-band arrangers in the business, I believe that in his small groups, such as this one, is where he really shines. In his small groups, there is a lightness and an attention to detail that his larger charts sometimes miss. His total reinvention of “Star Eyes”, is the standout on the album and one of the best versions of that old warhorse that I’ve ever heard.
  • Champian Fulton: Birdsong (Self-Release)
    • Champian teased the release of this album, when she guested on “Conversations with Curtis”, last spring. The album was not released until August. It was worth the wait. Champian Fulton has grown into one of the finest pianist/vocalists in jazz today. She is a consummate interpreter of a lyric and though she clearly has been influenced by several the greats, she sounds like no one, but herself. Did I also mention that her piano playing can swing you into bad health? This tribute to Bird, flies high.
  • Nubya Garcia: Source (Concord)
    • Nubya Garcia has been building to this moment for a few years now, with two well received and exciting Eps, before Source, her first full length album was released this year. If you’re familiar with her EPs, what is here will not be surprising. The 28-year-old British saxophonist has a sound that is influenced by the soulful ancestors, like Henderson and Turrentine, but rooted in the nascent London jazz scene of today. Downbeat has named Ms. Garcia, one of the 25 performers that could shape jazz for decades…I certainly hope that they’re right.
  • Connie Han: Iron Starlet (Mack Avenue)
    • I was unfamiliar with the work of this 24-year-old piano prodigy, until last January, when she was the victim of some vicious and sexist written attacks by a respected online jazz publication (which later claimed that they were hacked). This made me curious enough to explore her music for myself. I found her work to be surprisingly good. She knows her jazz vernacular, she is a strong soloist, who leaves plenty of room for her sidemen and she is a fine composer. Iron Starlet, her second album as a leader, stands favorably alongside of much of the released work of Ms. Han’s contemporaries and her elders, in 2020. Those who criticize her for reasons that have nothing to do with her music, ought to be ashamed of themselves.

There you have the first ten of my “30 for ’20”. And yes, I did break my three sentence rule, when it was absolutely necessary. I’ve included a Spotify playlist, below, with a track from each of the albums discussed in this article, to give y’all a taste. We will release two more posts, with 11 – 20 and 21 – 30, on the list, on successive days. Thoughts and opinions are welcome, as always, in the comments.

Piano In the Foreground, II (Podcast #18-013)

Piano solo, duet and trio interpretations of Ellington compositions by Duke and others….
Continue reading

……[M]y mother decided I should take piano lessons. My piano teacher, Mrs. Clinkscales (that was really her name), got paid several times a week for many weeks for these lessons, but I missed more than I took, because of my enthusiasm for playing ball, and running and racing through the street. That I remember very well, because when she had her piano recital with all her pupils in the church, I was the only one who could not play his part.

-Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


erroll garner

Duke Ellington and Erroll Garner


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Earl “Fatha” Hines and Duke Ellington


Transcription of Duke Ellington’s “In A Sentimental Mood” solo



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



de

In A Sentimental Mood (CD: “Piano Reflections” Capitol Jazz CDP 7 92863 2)

Recorded 13/14 April 1953

Duke Ellington – piano; Wendell Marshall – bass; Butch Ballard – drums.


evans

In A Sentimental Mood (CD: “Eloquence” Original Jazz Classics ‎OJCCD-814-2)

Recorded 1975, Montreux, Switzerland

Bill Evans – piano; Eddie Gomez – bass.


hines

In A Mellow Tone (CD: “Earl Hines plays Duke Ellington”

Recorded 27 November 1972, New York City

Earl Hines – piano.


R-6979598-1490539356-6224.jpeg

I Wanna Be A Rug Cutter (sic) (CD: “The Original Misty” Mercury ‎ 834 910-2)

Recorded 14 March 1955, Chicago

Erroll Garner – piano; Wyatt Ruther – bass; Eugene “Fats” Heard  – drums.


Monk

I Let a Song Go Out of my Heart (CD: “Thelonious Monk plays Duke Ellington” Universal 0546796)

Recorded 21 July 1955, Hackensack, New Jersey

Thelonious Monk – piano; Oscar Pettiford -bass; Kenny Clarke – drums.


Garner

Satin Doll (CD: “Ready Take One” Sony Music 88985363312)

Recorded 1967, New York City

Erroll Garner – piano;  Ike Isaacs – bass, Jimmie Smith – drums; Jose Mangual – congas.


tatum

Caravan (CD: “Art Tatum, The Complete Pablo Solo Masterpieces” Pablo 7PACD-4404-2)

Recorded 22 April 1954, Los Angeles

Art Tatum – piano


81R-fi4OThL._SX355_

Money Jungle (CD: “Money Jungle, Provocative In Blue” GrooveJazz Media LLC ‎– GJA 34026 02)

Released 2013

Gerald Clayton – piano; Christian McBride – bass; Terri Lynne Carrington – drums.


money jungle

Caravan (CD: “Money Jungle” Blue Note 7243 5 38227 2 9)

Recorded 17 September 1962, New York City

Duke Ellington – piano; Charles Mingus – bass; Max Roach – drums.


— Our closing music —-

0000120517

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.


Ellington & 100 years of Thelonious Monk and Dizzy Gillespie (Podcast #17-013)

Celebrating the 100th birth anniversaries of Thelonious Monk and Dizzy Gillespie through their connections with Duke Ellington. Continue reading

“I always like the bop, and I am proud to say that the fabulous, flamboyant John Birks Gillespie worked in our band once, for four weeks. Diz played with us at the Capitol Theatre in 1944, when we had the gorgeous Lena Horne on the bill. Of course, I’d known him for quite a while before that, because I was an avid visitor on Fifty-second Street.”

–  Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


 

monk and diz.jpg

Thelonious Monk and Dizzy Gillespie at the 1963 Monterey Jazz Festival. (Photo by Jim Marshall)


diz and duke

Duke Ellington and Dizzy Gillespie




 

DIZZY

Dizzy Gillespie at Disneyland, 1984. Autographed in 1985. (Photo by Steve Bowie.)



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



happy BD

Happy Birthday To You (CD: “Happy Birthday, Duke! The Birthday Sessions, Volume  3” Laser Light 15 785)

Recorded 30 April !953, Portland, Oregon

Willie Cook, Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, Juan Tizol – trombone ; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Rick Henderson, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Wendell Marshall – bass; Butch Ballard – drums.


 DG

Caravan (CD: “Dee Gee Days The Savoy Sessions” Savoy ZD70517)

Recorded 25 October 1951 in New York City

Dizzy Gillespie – trumpet; Stuff Smith – violin; Bill Graham – baritone sax; Milt Jackson – piano; Percy Heath – bass; Al Jones – drums; unknown – percussion.


 

jazz party

U.M.M.G./Hello, Little Girl (CD: “Jazz Party” Columbia CK-40712)

Recorded 19 February 1959 in New York City

Cat Anderson, Harold Baker, Clark Terry, Ray Nance – trumpet; Britt Woodman, Quentin Jackson, John Sanders – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmy Woode – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums, Jimmy Rushing – vocal.


 

Monk

Caravan (CD: “Thelonious Monk plays Duke Ellington”  Universal
0546796)

Recorded 21 July 1955, Hackensack, New Jersey

Thelonious Monk – piano; Oscar Pettiford -bass; Kenny Clarke – drums.


 

blanton webster

Sentimental Lady (CD: “The Blanton-Webster Band” Bluebird RCA 5659-2-RB35)

Recorded 28 July 1942 in Chicago

Wallace Jones, Rex Stewart, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Joe Nanton, Juan Tizol – trombone; Chauncy Haughton, Johnny Hodges, Otto Hardwicke, Ben Webster, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Fred Guy – guitar; Junior Raglin – bass; Sonny Greer – drums.


 

Thelonious_Monk_-_straight,_no_chaser

I Didn’t Know About You (CD: “Straight, No Chaser” Columbia/Legacy CK 64886)

Recorded 1966 in New York City

Charlie Rouse – tenor sax; Thelonious Monk – piano; Larry Gales – bass; Ben Riley – drums.


 

volume 3

Monk’s Dream (CD: “The Private Collection, Volume 3” Saja 91043-2)

Recorded 13 September 1962 in New York City

Cootie Williams, Bill Berry, Roy Burrowes, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Russell Procope, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Duke Ellington – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


 

Monk’s Dream/Frere Monk (LP: Gambit Records Ga 69299)

Recorded 8 July 1962, Newport, Rhode Island

Bill Berry, Roy Burrowes, Cat Anderson, Ray Nance – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone; Jimmy Hamilton, Gene Hull, Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney – reeds; Thelonious Monk – piano; Aaron Bell – bass; Sam Woodyard – drums.


 

0000120517

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.



 

When Cootie Left the Duke, Pt. II (Podcast #17-010)

Cootie Williams starts his own big band after a year long stint with Benny Goodman.
Continue reading

band award

 

“I didn’t drink at all until I got my band.” – Cootie Williams



 

BG



 



 

house of joy     Started

 



Dizzy



 

DAR

CW record

 



The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



 

CW Savoy

 

‘Round Midnight (CD: “Big Bands at The Savoy, Cootie Williams & Luis Russell”  JUCD 2064)

Recorded 12 February 1945 at the Savoy Ballroom, NYC

Cootie Williams, Harold “Money” Johnson, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell – trumpet; Ed Burke, Bob Horton – trombone; Charlie Parker, Frank Powell – alto sax; Lee Pope, Sam Taylor – tenor sax; Ed de Verteuil – baritone sax; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Leroy Kirkland – guitar; Carl Pruitt – bass; Sylvester Payne – drums.


 

CW Classics 1941-1944

(CD: “Cootie Williams and his Orchestra 1941-1944” Classics 827)

Recorded 1 April 1942 in Chicago

Fly Right (Epistrophy)

When My Baby Left Me 

Cootie Williams, Milton Fraser, Joe Guy, Louis Bacon – trumpets; Jonas Walker, Robert Horton, Sandy Williams – trombone; Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – alto sax, vocal; Bob Dorsey, Greely Walton – tenor sax; John Williams – baritone sax; Kenny Kersey – piano; Norman Keenan – bass; Butch Ballard – drums.

Recorded 4/6 January 1944 in New York City

You Talk a little trash

Honeysuckle Rose

Cootie Williams – trumpet, vocal; Ed Burke, Bob Horton, George Stevenson – trombone; Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – alto sax, vocal; Charlie Holmes – alto sax; Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, Lee Pope  – tenor sax; Bud Powell – piano; Norman Keenan – bass; Sylvester “Vess” Payne – drums.

Now I Know

Red Blues

Cootie Williams, Harold “Money” Johnson, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell – trumpet; Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – alto sax, vocal; Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis – tenor sax; Ed de Verteuil – baritone sax; Bud Powell – piano; Norman Keenan – bass; Sylvester “Vess” Payne – drums.

Recorded 22 August 1944 in New York City

Somebody’s Gotta Go 

 ‘Round Midnight

Cootie Williams, Lamar Wright, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell, Tommy Stevenson – trumpet; Ed Burke, Bob Horton, Ed Glover – trombone; Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson – alto sax, vocal; Frank Powell – alto sax; Lee Pope, Sam Taylor – tenor sax; Ed de Verteuil – baritone sax; Bud Powell – piano; Leroy Kirkland – guitar; Carl Pruitt – bass; Sylvester “Vess” Payne – drums.


 

CW Savoy

(CD: “Big Bands at The Savoy, Cootie Williams & Luis Russell”  JUCD 2064)

Roll ‘Em

Floogie Boo

Recorded 12 February 1945 at the Savoy Ballroom, NYC

Cootie Williams, Harold “Money” Johnson, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell – trumpet; Ed Burke, Bob Horton – trombone; Charlie Parker, Frank Powell – alto sax; Lee Pope, Sam Taylor – tenor sax; Ed de Verteuil – baritone sax; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Leroy Kirkland – guitar; Carl Pruitt – bass; Sylvester Payne – drums.


 

CW Classics 1945-1946

(CD: “Cootie Williams and his Orchestra 1945-1946” Classics 981)

Recorded 19 July 1945 in New York City

House of Joy

Cootie Williams, Harold “Money” Johnson, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell – trumpet; Ed Burke, Bob Horton – trombone; Rupert Cole, Frank Powell – alto sax; Lee Pope, Sam Taylor – tenor sax; Ed de Verteuil – baritone sax; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Leroy Kirkland – guitar; Jimmy Glover – bass; Sylvester Payne – drums.

Recorded 29 January 1946 in New York City

He Should’a flip’d when he flop’d 

Cootie Williams, Bob Merrill, Ermit V. Perry, George Treadwell, Billy Ford, Gene Redd – trumpet; Ed Burke, Bob Horton, Edward “Jack Raggs” Johnson – trombone; Rupert Cole, John Jackson– alto sax; Everett Gaines, Sam Taylor – tenor sax; Bob Ashton – baritone sax; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Sam “Christopher” Allen – guitar; Norman Keenan – bass; Butch Ballard – drums, Johnny Mercer – vocal.


 

CW Classics 1946-1949

(CD: “Cootie Williams and his Orchestra 1946-1949” Classics 1105)

I Can’t Get Started

Recorded 1947 in New York City (no precise date given)

Cootie Williams, Bob Merrill, Ermit V. Perry, Otis Gamble, Billy Ford, Clarence “Gene” Redd – trumpet; Ed Burke, Edward Johnson, Julius “Hawkshaw” Watson – trombone; Rupert Cole, Daniel Williams – alto sax; Chuck Clarke, Edwin Johnson – tenor sax; Bob Ashton – baritone sax; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Norman Keenan – bass; Butch Ballard – drums.

Save the Bones for Henry Jones

I Should O’ Been Thinkin’ Instead of Drinkin’

Recorded July 1947 in New York City

Cootie Williams, Bob Merrill – trumpet, vocal; Ermit V. Perry, Otis Gamble, Billy Ford, Clarence “Gene” Redd – trumpet; Ed Burke, Edward Johnson, Julius “Hawkshaw” Watson – trombone; Rupert Cole, Daniel Williams – alto sax; Chuck Clarke, Edwin Johnson – tenor sax; Bob Ashton – baritone sax; Arnold Jarvis – piano; Norman Keenan – bass; Butch Ballard – drums.


 

0000120517

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.



 

Piano in the Foreground (Podcast #17-008)

We feature piano versions of Ellington’s music, by the Maestro himself and other giants like Hines, Tyner, Waller, Tatum and others…. Continue reading


 



 

foreground



 

……[M]y mother decided I should take piano lessons. My piano teacher, Mrs. Clinkscales (that was really her name), got paid several times a week for many weeks for these lessons, but I missed more than I took, because of my enthusiasm for playing ball, and running and racing through the street. That I remember very well, because when she had her piano recital with all her pupils in the church, I was the only one who could not play his part.

-Duke Ellington, Music Is My Mistress


 

orson

Duke Ellington, Orson Welles and Cab Calloway


I was fortunate enough to see three of this podcast’s featured artists in concert and get their autographs:

peterson

Oscar Peterson (along with Ella Fitzgerald, Freddie Green, Al Grey, Bobby Plater and Tommy Flanagan)

tyner

McCoy Tyner

hines

Earl “Fatha” Hines





The recordings heard on this podcast episode:



Greatest Concert

Take the “A” Train (LP: “The Greatest Jazz Concert In The World” Pablo 2625-704)

Recorded 1 July 1967 at The Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles

Oscar Peterson – piano; Cootie Williams, Cat Anderson, Herbie Jones, Mercer Ellington – trumpet; Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Chuck Connors – trombone, Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope, Paul Gonsalves, Jimmy Hamilton, Harry Carney – reeds, John Lamb -bass; Chris Columbus – drums.


 

Whitney

Soda Fountain Rag (CD: “Live at The Whitney” Impulse/GRP 173)

Recorded 10 April 1972, New York City

Duke Ellington – piano.


 

Luigi

Soda Fountain Rag (CD: “Duke Ellington Piano Works” Dynamic CDS7743)

Recorded 2015, Italy

Luigi Polombi – piano.


 

Waller

 

Solitude (CD”Romance a la Mode” Jazzsential)

Recorded 16 September 1943, New York City

Fats Waller – organ, vocal.


 

kenny burrell

Orson (LP: “Ellington Is Forever, Volume 2” Fantasy 79008 )

Recorded November & December, 1975, Berkeley, California

Jimmy Jones – piano


 

Monk

Black and Tan Fantasy (CD: “Thelonious Monk plays Duke Ellington”  Universal
0546796)

Recorded 21 July 1955, Hackensack, New Jersey

Thelonious Monk – piano; Oscar Pettiford -bass; Kenny Clarke – drums.


 

Tatum

In a Sentimental Mood (CD: “Art Tatum Solo Masterpieces, Volume 8” Pablo PACD-2405-439-2)

Recorded 29 December 1953, Los Angeles

Art Tatum – piano.


 

McShann

What Am I Here For? (CD: “The Missouri Connection” Reservoir (City Hall) 124)

Recorded 15 September 1992, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey

Jay McShann, John Hicks – piano.


 

Garner

Caravan (CD: “Ready Take One” Sony Music 88985363312)

Recorded 2 December 1971, New York City

Erroll Garner – piano; Ernest McCarty, Jr. – bass; Jose Mangual – conga; Jimmie Smith – drums.


 

earl plays duke

Satin Doll (CD: “Jazz Royalty – Earl Hines plays Duke Ellington” New World Records
NW 81001)

Recorded 10 December 1971, New York City

Earl “Fatha” Hines – piano.


 

Tyner

Satin Doll (CD: “Double Trios”, Denon Records 1128)

Recorded 7 June 1986, New York City

McCoy Tyner – piano; Avery Sharpe – bass; Louis Hayes – drums.


 

Highlights

Pitter Panther Patter (CD: “Highlights of the Great 1940-1942 Band” Avid, AMSC1143)

Recorded 1 October 1940, Chicago

Duke Ellington – piano; Jimmie Blanton -bass.


 

This ones for Blanton

Pitter Panther Patter (CD: “This One’s for Blanton” Pablo PACD-2310-721-2)

Recorded 5 December 1972, Las Vegas

Duke Ellington – piano; Ray Brown – bass.


 

0000120517

It’s Something You Ought To Know (Paul Gonsalves – “Ellingtonia Moods and Blues,” RCA Victor / RCA63562)

Recorded 29 February 1960, New York City

Paul Gonsalves- tenor sax; Johnny Hodges – alto sax; Ray Nance – cornet; Mitchell “Booty” Wood – trombone; Jimmy Jones – piano; Al Hall – bass; Oliver Jackson – drums.